Monthly Archives: November 2015

Thanksgiving Mass & Blessing of Table Bread

Thursday, November 26th at 9:30am

Thanksgiving Mass will be celebrated this Thursday at 9:30am.  We look forwarded to welcoming visiting family and friends for the holiday as we gather in prayer along side our St. Raymond’s parish family as we give thanks to God for His abundant blessings.  We invite you to bring to Mass the bread that you will share later that day as family and friends gather together.  At the end of Mass, we will bless the breads as a prayer of blessing for our families.

Welcome Home!

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Pastor’s Corner

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

Grace to you and peace. On the 15th of November, we celebrate
the feast day of the amazing Dominican saint, Albert the Great.
He was known as the “teacher of everything there is to know.”
What a title! St. Albert was a scientist long before the age of
science. He loved the adventure of exploring creation with the
God-given powers of the human mind. To this day he is the
patron saint of natural scientists. In his own day, he was even
considered a wizard and magician. In a remarkable meeting of
two great men, St. Albert became the teacher and mentor of a
young man we now know as St. Thomas Aquinas.
I love this description of Albert and Thomas from the book
New Wine of Dominican Spirituality: A Drink Called
Happiness, by Fr. Paul Murray, O.P.: The age in which Albert
the Great and Thomas Aquinas carried out the mission handed
on to them by Dominic and the first generation of preachers—
the mid-thirteenth century—has been described as enjoying an
“intellectual inebriation” deeper and even more revolutionary
than that of the Renaissance. “It was not a revelation of plastic
beauty in the realm of imagination and sensibility; it was a
revelation of nature, of its truth, its being, in the realm of
intelligence.” Like a first Adam on earth, St. Albert was to
write at the time: “The whole world is theology for us, because
the heavens proclaim the glory of God.”

St. Albert the Great was a “Renaissance man” a hundred years
before the Renaissance—before it was cool. He was born in
Lauingen on the Danube, near Ulm, Germany; his father was a
military lord in the army of Emperor Frederick II. As a young
man, Albert studied at the University of Padua and there fell
under the spell of Blessed Jordan of Saxony, the Dominican
who made the rounds of the universities of Europe drawing the
best young men of the universities into the Order of Preachers.

After several teaching assignments in the Order, Albert came in
1241 to the University of Paris, where he lectured in theology.
While teaching in Paris, he was assigned in 1248 to set up a
house of studies for the Dominicans in Cologne. In Paris, he
had gathered around him a small band of budding theologians,
the chief of whom was Thomas Aquinas, who accompanied
him to Cologne and became his greatest pupil.
In 1260, Albert was appointed bishop of Regensberg; when he
resigned after three years, he was called to be an advisor to the
pope and was sent on several diplomatic missions. In his later
years, he resided in Cologne, took part in the Council of Lyons
in 1274, and in his old age traveled to Paris to defend the
teaching of his student, Thomas Aquinas.
It was in Cologne that Albert’s reputation as a scientist grew.
He carried on experiments in chemistry and physics in his
makeshift laboratory and built up a collection of plants, insects,
and chemical compounds that gave substance to his reputation.
When Cologne decided to build a new cathedral, he was
consulted about the design. He was friend and counselor to
popes, bishops, kings, and statesmen and made his own unique
contribution to the learning of his age.
He died a very old man in Cologne on November 15th, 1280,
and is buried in St. Andrea’s Church in that city. He was
canonized and declared a Doctor of the Church in 1931 by
Pope Pius XI. His writings are remarkable for their exact
scientific knowledge, and for that reason he has been made the
patron saint of scientists.
St. Albert the Great was convinced that all creation spoke of
God and that the tiniest piece of scientific knowledge told us
something about Him. Along with the Bible, God has given us
the book of creation revealing something of His wisdom and
power. In creation, together with St. Albert, we see the
wonderful hand of God.

Go and announce the Gospel of the Lord!

Fr. Christopher, O.P.

Parts of the above are adapted from The One Y ear Book of
Saints, by Fr. Clifford Stevens.

Pastor’s Corner

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

Grace to you and peace. “Sent to Preach the Gospel!” This is
the theme that will unite Dominicans and friends of the
Dominicans all over the world from November 7th, 2015, to
January 21st, 2017, as we celebrate together a Jubilee of the
800th anniversary of the Order of Preachers, approved by Pope
Honorius III in 1216.
In the early 1200’s, a joyful Spaniard named Dominic de
Guzman heard God’s call to become an itinerant preacher.
Inspired by the Holy Spirit, Dominic founded the Order of
Preachers, and for 800 years we have continued Saint
Dominic’s mission—to preach for the salvation of souls. The
Order of Preachers has proclaimed the Gospel in every corner
of the world. We do this for one simple reason: that every
human being may come to know and love Jesus Christ.
It was for this reason that Dominic founded the Order of
Preachers in 1216. Traveling through Spain and southern
France with his bishop, Diego, St. Dominic encountered many
confused people who had lost their Catholic faith and had come
to the strange and sad belief that the physical world in which
we live is evil and created by an evil god. Dominic saw the
need for good preachers who could explain the truth of the
Catholic faith and by grace reconcile those who had fallen away
from the God of love. The content may have changed, but there
are still many strange and sad beliefs in the world that ensnare
the minds and hearts of good people.
As members of the Order of Preachers, Fr. Augustine and I, and
the six other friars with whom we live, are called to follow in
the footsteps of St. Dominic, imitating his joy and mercy, and
preaching the Gospel to make disciples of Jesus Christ by
knowledge and by love. Our life in common as brothers, along
with our time in study and at prayer, allows us to contemplate
and to share the fruits of our contemplation in a bold
proclamation of the Good News to every land and nation.
The Jubilee of our 800th anniversary as the Order of Preachers
is meant to be a time of renewal. Each of us—as individuals
and as communities—is invited to rediscover the meaning and
value of the Dominican charism both in our lives and for the
world. St. Dominic saw the need for well-educated, joyful
preachers who could compassionately engage their
contemporaries and their cultures, sharing the Good News of
salvation and reconciling those who have lost their way.
We Dominicans commit ourselves to meeting this need, as real
today as it was 800 years ago. But we cannot do it alone. And
we never have. We can meet this need only if all of us—you
and I, the entire St. Raymond family—continue to radiate the
joy of the Gospel from the heart of Menlo Park. I hope this
Jubilee year helps us to grow even closer to one another and
learn from one another as we share this challenging mission. In
that spirit, I invite you to join me in the official prayer of the
Jubilee:
God, Father of mercy,
who called your servant Dominic de Guzman
to set out in faith as an itinerant pilgrim and a
preacher of grace,
as we celebrate the Jubilee of the Order
we ask you to pour again into us the Spirit of the
Risen Christ, that we might faithfully and joyfully
proclaim the Gospel of peace, through the same
Christ our Lord. Amen.

Go and announce the Gospel of the Lord!

Fr. Christopher, O.P.